Little Big Adventures Of A Cat Lost In The Woods

This new art series, created by Alena Tkach for NeonMob, is the story of a curious kitty named Pinkerton. Told through two beautifully illustrated images, our tiny hero makes new friends getting lost in the forest, and ultimately finding his way home.

On the subjects of cats and the inspiration for Pinkerton’s adventure, Tkach says, “I love cats and I am sure that most of people love them too. I have a cat named Lisa who is so playful and a great thief of various small things. I also used to collect photos of uncommon animals hugging or carrying cats. I love nature, the woods, mountains, undiscovered and secret places, so that’s where my idea comes from. Pinkerton is a small cat, who is exploring the world and is surprised by most things. This feature of his and his big round eyes made my friend invent a special verb “to pinkertone”, which he uses when somebody gawps.”

More info: Neonmob | Behance

via Little Big Adventures Of A Cat Lost In The Woods | Bored Panda.

Meet 12 More “Rejected Princesses” Who Were Too Badass For Disney (But Not This Book)

Although it bears a man’s name in the title, Mad Max: Fury Road inarguably belongs to a woman. Charlize Theron’s Imperator Furiosa is a brand of hard-charging desert queen rarely before depicted onscreen. If Jason Porath has anything to say about it, though, ass-kicking characters like Furiosa will one day be the new normal for women in sci-fi and fantasy.

Jason Porath

Porath came to Co.Create’s attention last summer when he first began his Rejected Princessesproject. The illustrated website decried our long-standing plague of ineffectual princesses who serve as mere plot points or trophies in most popular entertainment. Instead, Porath shone a light on some of the lesser-heralded incredible women throughout history who have been ignored by Disney—women like Sergeant Mariya Oktyabrskaya, the first female tanker to win the Hero of the Soviet Union award. The informative stories and skillfully rendered images didn’t merely pop up on Co.Create’s radar, though; the site went viral, earning Porath a book deal.

Although he’s been hard at work preparing for his forthcoming book, the artist has been keeping up the site as well. He recently reached his 50th Rejected Princess—Banu Goshasp: The Heroine Ancient Iran Wanted—and he’s still going steady. (Porath currently has 1,187 princesses on his master list.) At this point, though, the selection process has become much harder.

“I’ve definitely become more of a snob about it,” he says. “When picking a candidate, I want someone who has agency, personality, and conflict—and is unlike anyone I’ve already written about. It’s remarkably difficult to find all three in the same person. Because of that, I’ve taken to reading massive encyclopedia-esque listings of women cover-to-cover. When I find someone interesting in those books, I practically start my research on them all over, because I want to verify it in other sources. I’ve gotten a lot more thorough with the research, but it takes a lot more time.”

The effort is apparently worth it, however. Aside from the tangible outcomes, like the upcoming book and ongoing exposure, Porath has observed another benefit as the project’s impact increased alongside its popularity.

“Everyone wants to be seen. That means having their culture/subculture in a positive light, even if for just a second,” he says, “There’s a vast underserved population of people who never see the things they most closely identify with in a positive light. They get very excited when they’re represented.”

Rejected Princesses is not only a hit with people who’d like to see their inner-Furiosa or Daenerys Targaryen embodied in films—it also speaks to the general lack of diversity in the universe of animation. While a lot of movies deny their heroines self-actualization, all too many deny that any other varietal of female beyond white—or at least white-ish—exists. This project may not convince the studio heads to take a chance on a more rich spectrum of female characters, but perhaps it may give them something to ponder whilst tallying up box office receipts for Mad Max.

Have a look in the slides above for a smattering of more recent editions of Rejected Princesses.

This New Line Of Dolls Has Been Created For Children With Disabilities After Campaign

This New Line Of Dolls Has Been Created For Children With Disabilities After Campaign After a Facebook campaign called Toy Like Me was initiated calling for a more diverse representation of dolls for disabled children, Makies, a UK dollmaker responded by making the very thing that everyone was waiting for.

The company already has a system, much like build a bear, where you can choose the clothing, accessories, hair and skin colour for a doll – which is handy since we’ve never met a grown-up that looks like Barbie, let alone child – in order the achieve more of a likeness to yourself or anything you want. But now, due to demand, they are going to release a range of new accessories including a cane, hearing aids, wheelchairs, and they are working on a system whereby birth marks can be added in the same spot as where the potential owner in question has one. Thanks to 3D-printing, the process is now quicker and more efficient than ever before so they can meet supply and demand. The dolls will be in store soon and will retail at roughly £74. Toy Like Me is still crusading to get more toy manufactorers like Mattel and Playmobil to play ball and we’re sure their pleas will be heard.

via This New Line Of Dolls Has Been Created For Children With Disabilities After Campaign

Break the Cutie

Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them—in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

—Kurt Vonnegut, “Eight Rules for Writing Fiction”

A series introduces a character as sweet and lovable, more comic relief than anything, who likes nothing more than to pet little creatures. They make you adore them, root for them and love them.

Then the writers proceed to slowly torment them in front of your very eyes. They destroy everything important to them, kill everyone they love and make them suffer from horrible accidents, diseases and acts of violence, including but not limited to torture, rape or any other Fate Worse Than Death. They beat the character with one cruel stroke of fate after another until they are just an Empty Shell of their former cheerful, carefree self.

This technique is often used to build The Woobie in an attempt to enhance “adorability” points. Writers have to be careful or else The Cutie will become the universe’s Chew Toy.

Be careful about tormenting sweet little things—sometimes instead of breaking, or when there’s nothing left to break, they Freak Out. If they snap, you’d better hope your life insurance policy is up to date, especially if the cutie was a badass to begin with. If they break but refuse to show it, they could be a Type A Stepford Smiler.

Sometimes it can be Corrupt the Cutie, where the girl in question breaks it by herself. Frequently a part of a character crossing the Despair Event Horizon or the cause of a Heroic BSOD. Also frequently part of the backstory of the Broken Bird, and instrumental in the Freudian Excuse of a villain who Used to Be a Sweet Kid. Compare Fragile Flower and Wide-Eyed Idealist.

On a more constructive note, sometimes breaking the cutie can result in a cute but weak character Taking a Level in Badass as they confront their tormentors and become more assertive. When the cutie refuses to break, they might become an iron or stoic Woobie, a Determinator, or a Plucky Girl. If they are simply unbreakable to begin with, they are probably a Pollyanna.

Contrast Break the Haughty, where bad things happen to an arrogant person (who had it coming), Break the Badass (when a super-strong person is put through the gutter), or the even worse variation Kill the Cutie.

via Break the Cutie – TV Tropes.

12 Zodiac Signs Reborn As Terrifying Monsters By Damon Hellandbrand

Just because a character has been around forever doesn’t mean there aren’t new ways to reimagine it. Damon Hellandbrand, a talented artist based in the U.S., has created a series of images that portray the symbols of the zodiac as twisted, surreal creatures straight out of a nightmarish realm.

Hellandbrand does much of his art with various digital illustration programs, but some are born as pencil drawings or watercolors – or “basically whatever medium I’m in the mood for.” He writes that he is inspired by artists like Ralph McQuarrie, Boris Vallejo and Frank Frazetta, and it’s easy to imagine that Guillermo Del Toro might number among his influences as well. Read on for Hellandbrand’s answers to Bored Panda’s questions about his work!

More info: dhellandbrand.com | DeviantArt (h/t: gallowboob)

Aries

I have a fondness for anything fantasy related or anything that doesn’t exist in reality,” Damon Hellandbrand told Bored Panda, “and mythology certainly has that in spades

Taurus

I think also because those were some of the first stories I remember as a child in school that they just stuck with me

Gemini

I basically took what I knew the signs represented in terms of their name (i.e. Cancer = Crab, Leo = Lion, Pisces = Fish etc). and proceeded to illustrate them as human/animal hybrids

Cancer

I did this by doing a black and white pencil drawing on paper and then scanning the illustration into a drawing/painting program called Corel Painter to color and paint

Leo

I didn’t do as much research on these symbols as I should have and I’ve gotten a lot of responses as such, so needless to say I’ll be making a few new pieces to redeem myself

Virgo

Libra

Scorpio

Sagittarius

Capricorn

Aquarius

Pisces

via 12 Zodiac Signs Reborn As Terrifying Monsters By Damon Hellandbrand | Bored Panda.

This Artist Puts Disney Characters Into Real-Life Situations

1. What is Jasmine doing in the club?

What is Jasmine doing in the club?

“In The Club Like” by Harry McNally hm-co.myshopify.com

2. Why are Lady Tremaine, Drizella, and Anastasia walking to the ball?

Why are Lady Tremaine, Drizella, and Anastasia walking to the ball?

“Mean Girls” by Harry McNally hm-co.myshopify.com

They’re there because that’s where Harry McNally put them.

3. McNally is a photographer, and for his “Moments Like This” series he superimposes Disney characters (like Cinderella) on to 35mm photographs.

McNally is a photographer, and for his "Moments Like This" series he superimposes Disney characters (like Cinderella) on to 35mm photographs.

“Transformation” by Harry McNally hm-co.myshopify.com

4. This image of Alice lost in the New York subway system (“Which Way Is Up”) was the first in the series.

This image of Alice lost in the New York subway system ("Which Way Is Up") was the first in the series.

“Which Way Is Up” by Harry McNally http://”hm-co.myshopify.com

5. Suddenly Mickey becomes a janitor….

6. …and Gus Gus gets drunk.

...and Gus Gus gets drunk.

“Afterhours” by Harry McNally hm-co.myshopify.com

7. What kind of prescription could Snow White be taking?

What kind of prescription could Snow White be taking?

“Excuse Me” by Harry McNally hm-co.myshopify.com

Maybe the poisoned apple left permanent damage.

8. Without a pumpkin coach, Cinderella is forced to take the subway.

Without a pumpkin coach, Cinderella is forced to take the subway.

“End Of The Night” by Harry McNally hm-co.myshopify.com

9. How does he match up each character and photograph (like Ariel and this bedroom scene) so perfectly?

How does he match up each character and photograph (like Ariel and this bedroom scene) so perfectly?

“Where Have You Been” by Harry McNally hm-co.myshopify.com

McNally played it coy and told BuzzFeed Life that “the ideas come to me in my sleep.”

10. Although he’s marvelous at creating these moments melding fantasy and reality, McNally said he has never been a huge Disney fan (sorry, Peter Pan).

Although he's marvelous at creating these moments melding fantasy and reality, McNally said he has never been a huge Disney fan (sorry, Peter Pan).

“Diagnosis” by Harry McNally hm-co.myshopify.com

“However, I grew up with two sisters, so I was exposed to a lot of these films. Sometimes unwillingly. I am seeing a therapist now.”

11. Cogsworth is not impressed with this display, but if *you* are, you can buy prints of McNally’s work here.

And if you don’t have the money for a print, go ahead and follow McNally on Instagram to see who he drops into the real world next.

via This Artist Puts Disney Characters Into Real-Life Situations.