Still I Rise by Maya Angelou

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Bloody hell: Disney made an animated ‘period’ short about menstruation

Beginning in 1946 and continuing into the 1960s, Disney gave young women the “talk” about their periods with an educational animated short titled The Story of Menstruation. The 10-minute stylized animation, produced by Walt Disney Productions, was backed by the company behind tampon brand Kotex (then it was the International Cello-Cotton Company, now it’s Kimberly-Clark). Kotex boasts that it taught 105 million girls, in health education classes across the United States, about puberty and good ol’ Aunt Flo.

All these millions of girls were also given Very Personally Yours, a propagandic booklet that expands on the film’s knowledge.

The female narrator explains that this booklet “explodes that old taboo against bathing during your period.”

Not only can you bathe, you should bathe. Because during menstruation, your perspiration glands are working overtime.

These young women were also given pointers on how to suck it up when they are feeling irritable:

Don’t let it get you down. After all, you have to live with people. You have to live with yourself too. And once you stop feeling sorry for yourself and take those days in your stride, you’ll find it’s easier to keep smiling and even tempered.

 And as for the old taboo against exercise, that’s nonsense. Exercise is good for you during menstruation. Just use common sense.

Darnit.

Watch it for yourself and see if you learn anything new about that time of the month.

via Bloody hell: Disney made an animated ‘period’ short about menstruation | Dangerous Minds.

Seven Brave and Powerful Magazine Covers

The D&AD Awards Magazine & Newspaper Design category celebrates the absolute pinnacle in digital magazines, magazine design, supplements, editorial design and magazine layouts. But sometimes it’s the simplest of magazine cover designs that win over a jury. The examples below show D&AD award winning, powerful front covers that revel in their own bravery.

Bloomberg Businessweek

Award: In Book / Magazine & Newspaper Design / Magazine Front Covers / 2012

For Bloomberg, the goal is to design original, surprising covers each week that make people pick up the magazine. They strive for something that looks a little removed from what people traditionally perceive an American business magazine to look like, yet something accessible to anyone passing a newsstand.

Bloomberg Businessweek – Steve Jobs 1955-2011

Award: Yellow Pencil / Magazine & Newspaper Design / Entire Magazines / 2012

Official word of Steve Jobs’ death reached ‘Bloomberg Businessweek’ as the staff of 40 was finishing a regular issue. The regular issue was scrapped and the staff spent all night finalising the special issue. The special issue provides an in-depth look at the man behind all the products that the world admires.

Granta 110: Sex

Award: In Book / Magazine & Newspaper Design / Magazine Front Covers / 2011

Granta magazine tackles numerous themes through literature and art. In this issue, they addressed the toughest topic of all – sex – from an array of angles. 110 provides an example of how Granta try to use cover art to initiate dialogue and as the catalyst for branding universal topics. The cover was printed on a tactile, velveteen stock, playing on our sense of touch.

The New York TImes Magazine Israel vs Iran

Award: In Book / Magazine & Newspaper Design / Magazine & Newspaper Front Covers / 2013

Agency: There Is

For the ‘Israel vs Iran’ cover, a war- torn approach was in order, creating the headline in the smouldering remains of the aftermath of conflict. The challenge was to express drama in a rough yet clean aesthetic using raw and evocative materials. Achieving clear legibility while retaining an organic feel to the type was key to creating a bold typographic piece that resonated strongly with the subject.

Wallpaper* Work Issue

Award: In Book / Magazine & Newspaper Design / Magazine Front Covers / 2009

Four covers were produced for Wallpaper* magazine’s first ever work-themed issue, using bold, striking type, with their own slogans: ‘Work is Play’; ‘Work More Live More’; ‘Work Hard and Be Nice to People’; and ‘Play and Work and Play’.

Typical of Anthony Burrill’s style, the covers were an apt continuation of his cult ‘Work Hard’ poster. The four collectable covers also used an experimental matt printing technique to further the tactility and individuality of each issue.

Time Magazine

Award: In Book / Magazine & Newspaper Design / Magazine Front Covers / 2009

Agency: Euro RSCG

Time Magazine approached Euro RSCG with an opportunity to create a cover for their special issue, ‘100 Most Influential People’. They decided to use all 100 influential people in the composite of this one face.

New York Magazine – The City and the Storm

Award: Nomination / Magazine & Newspaper Design / Magazine & Newspaper Front Covers / 2013

New York Magazine sent photographer Iwan Baan up in a helicopter as Hurricane Sandy lifted and produced the image that, for many New Yorkers, told its own story. Because most other air traffic was grounded, the controllers allowed the helicopter a much higher ceiling than usual, giving Baan a far better vantage point than he’d otherwise have. We see laid out before us the familiar silhouette of lower Manhattan, inked out; a visual sinkhole – and then, to the north, slicing across as if with a razor, the dividing line that demarcates a city blazing with light.

via Seven Brave and Powerful Magazine Covers | D&AD.

 

Comcast Beautifully Shows How a 7-Year-Old Girl Who Is Blind Imagines The Wizard of Oz

The first big national spot from GS&P’s NYC office is a triumph.

Here’s an ad that should be a show-stopper during the Oscars on Sunday night.

The beautiful 60-second spot from Comcast tells the story of Emily, a 7-year-old girl who was born blind. Comcast asked Emily to describe what she sees in her mind’s eye when she watches The Wizard of Oz—and then the company built that version for her, using skilled set and puppet designers and makeup artists.

The ad goes on to explain that people with visual disabilities can get more out of watching TV with Comcast’s “talking guide.” Developed by the Comcast Accessibility Lab, it includes voice guidance and one-touch access to closed captioning—and is part of Comcast’s commitment to helping people with disabilities enjoy entertainment.

Two-time Academy Award winner Robert Redford delivers the voiceover at the end.

The spot, which alone is a wonderful mix of palpable emotion and impeccable craft, is supported by lots of online materials that show the whole backstory. There are videos introducing Emily, showing her describe her Oz in much greater detail, and highlighting the craftsmanship that went into building the physical manifestation of what she imagines.

The website, EmilysOz.com, developed by agency Huge, also offers more information about the technology behind Comcast’s accessibility services.

All in all, it’s one of the more beautiful campaigns of the year so far.

“We want to create opportunities for people who love film and television but who might not have the opportunity to experience it to its fullest,” said Tom Wlodkowski, Comcast’s vice president of audience, who has been focusing on the usability of the company’s products and services for people with disabilities. “By bringing the talking guide to as many people as possible, we can help to bridge that gap and make entertainment just as compelling, captivating and fun for people with a visual disability as it is for anyone else.”

It’s also a major creative triumph for the agency.

“We’re really proud of this one,” said Paul Caiozzo, executive creative director of Goodby, Silverstein & Partners in New York. “It’s the first big national spot to come from this office, and it’s great to have this work debut on a big stage like the Oscars. It’s a beautiful moment for GS&P New York.”

He added: “It’s not often you get to do something that feels meaningful on a level far beyond advertising. It definitely shows how entertainment truly is for everyone.”

See the supporting videos below:

CREDITS
Client: Comcast/Xfnity
Senior Director, Brand Strategy and Communications: Sherri Davis
Campaign: “Emily’s Oz”
Campaign Website: http://emilysoz.com

Agency: Goodby Silverstein & Partners, New York

Creative
Co-Chairmen: Jeff Goodby, Rich Silverstein
Executive Creative Director: Paul Caiozzo
Creative Director: Nathan Frank
Art Directors: Michael Hagos, Peter Jostrand
Copywriters: Josh Chua, Sam Dolphin

Account Services
Managing Director: Nancy Reyes
Account Manager: Laura McWhorter
Assistant Account Manager: Nate Baker

Brand and Communication Strategy
Group Brand Strategy Director: Conner Huber
Brand Strategist: Jane Jun

Business Affairs
Senior Business Affairs Manager: Judy Ybarra

Production
Director of Broadcast Production: Tod Puckett
Executive Broadcast Producer: James Horner
Broadcast Producer: Tess Kenner
Assistant Broadcast Producer: Charlotte Dugoni

Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks
Director: Andreas Nilsson
Director of Photography: Matty Libatique
Production Designer: KK Barrett
Managing Director: Shawn Lacy
Executive Producer: Colleen O’Donnell
Line Producer: Emily Skinner

Editing, Finishing: Rock Paper Scissors
Editor: Paul Watts
Assistant Editors:  Christian Oreste, Rhys Hecox
Executive Producer:  Eve Kornblum
Producers: Jenny Greenfield, Jen Milano

Visual Effects: A52
Lead Flame Artist: Stefan Gaillot
Computer Graphics Supervisor: Kirk Shintani
2-D Visual Effects Artists: Stefan Gaillot, Matt Sousa, Andy Bate, Enid Dalkoff, Steve Wolf, Tiffany Germann
3-D Artists: Jose Limon, Joe Paniagua, Jon Balcome, Christian Sanchez, Adam Carter, Paulo Mauro, Vivian Su
Producer: Scott Boyajan
Executive Producers: Patrick Nugent, Jennifer Sofio Hall

Telecine: Company 3
Colorists: Tim Masick, Rob Sciarratta
Executive Producer: Angela Lupo
Color Producer: Rochelle Brown

Mix: Heard City
Sound Engineers: Keith Reynaud, Jeremy Siegel
Managing Director: Gloria Pitagorsky
Senior Producer: Sasha Awn

Sound Design: Jafbox Sound
Sound Designer: Joseph Fraioli

End Treatment Graphics: Elevel Post
Animator: Jessica Gibson
Executive Producer: PJ Koll
Producer: Samantha Liss

—Behind-the-Scenes Documentaries
Director: Cassie Jaye
Directors of Photography: Margaret Parus, Sertac Yildizhan

Editing Company: Main Documentary
Production Company: Rock Paper Scissors
Editor: Parker Whipple
Producers: Jenny Greenfield, Jen Milano

Editing Company: Mini Documentaries
Production Company: Elevel (Goodby, Silverstein & Partners)
Editor: Graham Willcox
Assistant Editor: Lori Arden
Producers: Carley Ridgway, Samantha Liss

via Ad of the Day: Comcast Beautifully Shows How a 7-Year-Old Girl Who Is Blind Imagines The Wizard of Oz | Adweek.